Germany has shut down 3 of its last 6 nuclear power plants. The state wants to completely give up nuclear energy

Germany has shut down 3 of its last 6 nuclear power plants. The state wants to completely give up nuclear energy
Germany has shut down 3 of its last 6 nuclear power plants. The state wants to completely give up nuclear energy

Germany has shut down three of its remaining 6 nuclear power plants, trying to carry out its plan to abandon nuclear power and focus on renewable energy, Reuters reports.

The German government has decided to speed up the process of dropping nuclear power following the worst nuclear accident since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster – Fukushima, when in 2011 an earthquake and tsunami destroyed the nuclear power plant off the coast of Japan.

The Brokdorf, Grohnde and Gundremmingen C reactors, operated by E.ON and RWE, closed on Friday after 35 years of operation.

The last three nuclear power plants – Isar 2, Emsland and Neckarwestheim II – will be phased out by the end of 2022.

Preussen Elektra, the E.ON subsidiary that operated the Brokdorf and Grohnde power plants, said on Saturday that the two were closed shortly before midnight on Friday. RWE said Gundremmingen C had shut down power generation on Friday night.

PreussenElektra CEO Guido Knott thanked the staff for their commitment to safety: “We have made a decisive contribution to providing safe, environmentally friendly and reliable electricity in Germany for decades.”

Stopping the use of an energy source that some see as clean and cheap is an irreversible step for Europe’s largest economy, as it faces ambitious climate targets and high energy prices.

The six nuclear power plants accounted for about 12% of Germany’s electricity production in 2021, according to preliminary data. The share of renewable energy was almost 41%, with coal generating just under 28% and gas around 15%.

Germany aims to supply 80% of its energy demand using renewable sources by 2030 by expanding wind and solar infrastructure.

The Japanese government on Tuesday mapped out a plan to dump contaminated water from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant into the sea, a move that angered China and South Korea.

The European Commission has launched a project in which some nuclear power plants as well as some that use natural gas as fuel will be considered green projects, if they meet certain conditions, writes Reuters.

Read also Germany gets support from four other EU states to keep nuclear power from being considered “green”

Editor : A.C.

 
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